CHAOS A.D. (2016)

BY BLAINE McLARENThe good folks at Sleaze Box have been working overtime to bring us some of the best no-budget exploitation films since bursting on to the scene with Amerikan Holokaust a few years back.  As rough-around-the-edges as that first movie was, there was something unique and fantastically DIY about their vision.  Chris Woods and company have been putting out a lot of titles and each release has shown a progression in craft, but (thank God) not lost that charm and grittiness that I have come to love.  Their name says it all. These are sleazy, fun exploitation films that make Florida seem even more dangerous than any twenty-four hour news cycle could ever imagine.  They wear their influences on their sleeves, but they are not pulling from your typical pool of influential movie directors. Directors like Bruno Mattei and Todd Sheets have made major impressions on these guys and it shows up in a glorious way.  Their most recent effort, Chaos A.D., is no exception.  We are treated again to an ultra-violent world of naked ladies, over the top gore and way too much of actor Bob Glazier’s anatomy.

 

The story takes place on Halloween night and we are introduced to a housewife, a brother and sister and a hooker loving politician.  Each of our central characters are kidnapped by a gang of viciously perverse weirdos that are ready to celebrate the night with torture and murder.  Once our protagonists are forced into their world, its a non-stop game of blood thirsty cat and mouse.

Having seen all of Sleaze Box’s releases this film is a big leap in production and sets.  Most of their films have been pretty minimalists, but they seem to go out of their way to mix things up this time around.  Also, Chris Woods spends more time developing characters and establishing who these folks are.  Ashley Lynn Caputo really shines as a housewife with a secret and I cannot believe how well she plays her role.  Both her and Bob Glazier steal every scene they are in, not to mention giving brave (nudity filled) performances.  Overall, the acting is pretty great.  Most of these actors have worked with Sleaze Box before and seem to have a level of comfort that is rarely seen in no-budget filmmaking.  My only complaint is very minor.  The runtime is a little longer than expected, but luckily it doesn’t feel too padded.  I just prefer these types of movies to be shorter and more briskly paced.  Besides running a little long, this is another great “gore and gals” roughie that lives up to its provocative title.  This may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but for the few who dig this kind of unapologetically filthy filmakking will love the shit out of Chaos A.D.  The film has not been released yet, but is currenly available to pre-order at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/chaos-a-d#/

[usr 4]

 

BLAINE’S TOP 15 OF 2015

Holy Shit!  Another year has come and gone and now its time to see which films rose above the rest.  This year’s list includes all of the blood, guts and nudity that you would expect. But don’t worry, I included a few “classier” flicks for all you college grads out there. 

15.  The Duke of Burgundy (Directed by Peter Strickland)

A cold and confounding movie about a woman obsessed with moths who tests the limits of her relationship with her lover.  An exercise in obsession and repetition, that is worth enduring.

 

 

14. Tantrum (Directed by James Bell)

There are a lot of words that can be used to describe Mr Bell’s most recent film, but there is one that I keep using: indescribable. Not narrowly fitting into any real genre of horror or scene. It blurs the line between avant garde film experiment and performance art in a masterful way.

13. Girlhood (Directed by Céline Sciamma)

On top of covering the usual coming of age drama, there is a naturalness that feels so real and universal. From the boring technical side it is nearly perfect. Camerawork  is impeccable and its pace is perfectly meandering. The film may suffer from an unfortunate title, but hopefully people will see it without the looming Boyhood comparison.

12. Death-Scort Service (Directed by Sean Donohue)

A fun throwback to blood, guts and boobs.  The sleaziest film of 2015 and should not be missed.

 

 

 

 

 

11. Circus Of The Dead (Directed by Billy Pon)

Great sense of direction and great acting by Bill Oberst Jr and company. Also, some of the most enjoyable gore gags in years. When it finally gets a release, it is worth a look.

 

 

10. R100 (Directed by Hitoshi Matsumoto)

Like a blend of Quentin Dupieux and Sion Sono, with a little Bunuel on the side. I can’t decide if anything or everything matters (in this film) but there is something so unique and appealing about this film that really sticks with you.

 

9. Headless (Directed by Arthur Cullipher)

Found was one of my favorite movies of last year and this “lost slasher” is a excellent companion piece.  Great effects, fun acting and some of the nastiest kills in the history of cinema.

 

 

 

8. Der Samurai (Directed by Till Kleinert)

A spectacularly violent and mysterious film that feels both existential and playful throughout its run time. This is the kind of movie that requires multiple viewings to truly grasp.

 

7. Flowers (Directed by Phil Stevens)

This is the kind of film that is missing from underground horror lately. A grotesque, but beautifully shot film that mutely tells the story of 6 women and their murderer.

 

 

 

6. Androgynym (Directed by Nick Iway)

 This is a brave movie that does not gloss over things like addiction, loss and self identity.  In fact, it barrels itself directly at it.  There are scenes of extreme and shocking violence, but I hope they do not overshadow the beautiful experience that is Androgynym

5. The Interior (Directed by Trevor Juras)

There is very little when it comes to plot or story and instead focuses on the existential horror of being a young man who may not live long enough to figure out what he wants in life. That is much scarier to me than monsters or masked killers and there is no place better to experience this than deep inside of nature.

 

 

4. Turbo Kid (Directed by François Simard, Anouk Whissell)

In the year 1997…

This is the movie that captures nostalgia without coming off as pandering.

 

 

3. Spring (Directed by Aaron Moorhead, Justin Benson)

A beautifully shot genre bending project from the guys who brought us Resolution.

 

 

 

 

 

2. Bone Tomahawk (Directed by S. Craig Zahler)

If there was any justice in this world this film would sweep the Oscars. From best screenplay to best supporting actor, this film would win it all. This first time effort is everything that a fan of cinema could ask for.

 

 

 

 

 

1. The Tribe (Directed by Miroslav Slaboshpitsky)

“Don’t tell me, show me!” That is my battle cry when watching movies and this film couldn’t tell you if it wanted to. If you do not already know, this movie is told entirely through Ukrainian sign language with no subtitles or voiceover.  It is an unsettling, unique experience that cannot be compared to anything else.  A great example of how a film can transcend genre and language to stands on its own.

Some honorable mentions: Metalhead, The World Of Kanako, Mad Max: Fury Road and Under The Rainbow

Thanks for checking out my list!  Now let us know some of your picks in the comments below!

Blaine McLaren

Lead Writer for Mondo McLaren

THE INTERIOR (2015 BURIED ALIVE FILM FEST)

There is a moment at film festivals that really differ from any other movie watching experience.  This moment is directly after the credits, your short time to stretch your legs, go to the bathroom and check your phone messages.  What happens during this time is the best, you talk with other festival goers and see what the “other guy” thought.  The festival that I saw The Interior was a horror festival and found that I may have been one of the only viewers who really loved this flick.

Most people said that it was too slow or that was not enough true “horror” in this film.  My unpopular opinion was hard to defend.  Yes, it was slow.  Yes, it wasn’t a conventional horror story…but dammit!  It was beautiful, introspective and created a meandering experience that hit that sweet spot between the experimental docudrama of Herzog and the eeriness of a tent horror film like The Blair Witch Project.  I tell this long story to prepare you, THIS IS NOT YOUR TYPICAL HORROR FLICK.  This is something contemplative and experimental.  It sticks with you for days and takes time to simmer and really be appreciated.

 

The story is about James who is an office worker in his mid-twenties.  He lives a meandering and miserable life, without any real passion or direction.  He eventually goes to a doctor about some minor symptoms and gets some troubling news (which the details are never explained).  From there he eventually cuts all ties and moves to the woods because he “wants the opposite of this”.  He then wanders the woods and starts to experience terrifying nightmares and run-ins with strangers, deep within the dense woods of Canada.

 

There is very little when it comes to plot or story and instead focuses on the existential horror of being a young man who may not live long enough to figure out what he wants in life.  That is much scarier to me than monsters or masked killers and there is no place better to experience this than deep inside of nature.  The sound design heightens both the serenity and tension, using either natural soundscapes or intense classical pieces.  I could go on and on about how much I love this movie, but don’t want to venture into spoiler territory.  What I can say is that this is a movie worth your time and attention, especially if you are sick of half-assed paranormal flicks.  This is a beautiful film that will eventually find its audience and I will not be surprised to find it on a lot of top ten lists for 2015.  The Interior is currently on its festival rounds and I will update when release  dates are available.

4/5 STARS